GRE

About GRE

Getting an advanced degree can create many opportunities. In fact, recent data from the  Bureau of Labor Statistics and  The Organisation for Economic Co-operation (PDF)  illustrates how education pays in higher earnings and lower unemployment rates.Whether you are planning to go to graduate school or business school — or just exploring your options — you are taking an important step toward your future. It is a smart move to show schools your best and with the GRE® revised General Test, you can! That's the Power of Confidence — only with the GRE revised General Test.

The GRE revised General Test gives you the Power of Confidence to help you do your best. With the GRE revised General Test, you decide which scores to send to schools. If you feel you didn't do your best on test day, that's okay. You can retake the test and then send only the scores you want schools to see. It's all part of the ScoreSelect® option, only available with GRE® tests.

Plus, the GRE revised General Test is the only admissions test for graduate or business school that lets you skip questions within a section, go back and change answers, and have control to tackle the questions within a section you want to answer first.

The GRE revised General Test features question types that closely reflect the kind of thinking you'll do in graduate or business school.

Verbal Reasoning- Measures your ability to analyze and evaluate written material and synthesize information obtained from it, analyze relationships among component parts of sentences and recognize relationships among words and concepts.

Quantitative Reasoning- Measures problem-solving ability, focusing on basic concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and data analysis.

Analytical Writing- Measures critical thinking and analytical writing skills, specifically your ability to articulate and support complex ideas clearly and effectively.

Learn more about the content and structure of the GRE revised General Test.

Who Takes It?

Prospective graduate and business school applicants from all around the world who are interested in pursuing a master's, MBA, specialized master's in business or doctoral degree take the GRE revised General Test. Applicants come from varying educational and cultural backgrounds and the GRE revised General Test provides schools with a common measure for comparing candidates' qualifications.

GRE scores are used by admissions or fellowship panels to supplement your undergraduate records, recommendation letters and other qualifications for graduate-level study.

When and Where Do People Take It?

The GRE revised General Test is available at more than 850 test centers in more than 160 countries. In most regions of the world, the computer-delivered test is available on a continuous basis throughout the year. In Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Korea, the computer-delivered test is available one to three times per month. In areas of the world where computer-delivered testing is not available, the paper-delivered test is available up to three times a year in October, November and February.

See Test Centers and Dates for all regions.

Who Accepts It?

The GRE revised General Test is accepted at thousands of graduate and business schools as well as departments and divisions within these schools. View this list (PDF).

Why GRE

GRE® Test Fairness and Validity

 

ETS and the GRE® Program make ensuring the fairness and validity of GRE tests throughout the test development, administration and scoring processes a high priority. To ensure that these goals are reached, ETS has developed a meticulous system of internal checks and balances, and audit teams routinely verify that all tests and services meet rigorous professional standards such as those outlined by the American Psychological Association, American Educational Research Association and National Council on Measurement in Education.

Fairness

 

Fairness concerns are an integral part of the development and scoring of all tests. The many activities that ensure fairness include:

  • fairness evaluations by trained reviewers
  • routine analyses of test questions to establish that questions do not unfairly contribute to group differences
  • rigorous training for all persons involved in the development or scoring of test questions to ensure that all examinees have an equal opportunity to demonstrate their skills and abilities
  • appropriate accommodations (e.g., alternate test formats, extra time) for examinees who have disabilities or health-related needs

Validity

 

Validity research and analyses establish that the test measures what it is supposed to measure. The GRE Program has documented evidence of the following types of validity in GRE tests:

  • construct validity (the test measures the skills/abilities that should be measured)
  • content validity (the test measures appropriate content)
  • predictive validity (the test predicts success)
  • consequential validity (the test demonstrates that adverse consequences are minimal)
  • external validity (the test has the expected relationship with other measures of the same construct)

Although ETS works to accumulate validity evidence at each stage of the delivery and scoring process, the initial impetus for validity research comes from feedback from members of the graduate school community, who provide information about the skills and abilities that they consider essential for success in graduate school.

Verbal Reasoning Measure

 

The Verbal Reasoning measure of the GRE® revised General Test assesses verbal reasoning skills. These skills have been identified by graduate and business school deans and faculty as critical for success in graduate and business school. The capabilities that are assessed include:

  • the ability to understand text (such as the ability to understand the meanings of sentences, to summarize a text, or to distinguish major points from irrelevant points in a passage)
  • the ability to interpret discourse (such as the ability to draw conclusions, to infer missing information or to identify assumptions)

Quantitative Reasoning Measure

 

The Quantitative Reasoning measure of the GRE revised General Test assesses quantitative reasoning skills. The skills assessed are consistent with capabilities outlined in the Mathematical Association of America's Quantitative Reasoning for College Graduates: A Complement to the Standards and are based on feedback from faculty surveys. The capabilities that are assessed in the GRE Quantitative Reasoning measure include:

  • reading and understanding quantitative information
  • interpreting and analyzing quantitative information, including drawing inferences from data
  • using mathematical methods to solve quantitative problems

Exam content

Test Content and Structure

 

The GRE® revised General Test features question types that closely reflect the kind of thinking you’ll do — and the skills you need to succeed — in today's demanding graduate and business school programs. The test-taker friendly design lets you skip questions within a section, go back and change answers and have the flexibility to choose which questions within a section you want to answer first. Get a look at the structure of the computer-delivered or paper-delivered GRE revised General Test.

The GRE revised General Test measures your verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, critical thinking and analytical writing skills — skills that have been developed over a long period of time and are not related to a specific field of study but are important for all. Here's a look at content covered in the three test sections — Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing.

 

Verbal Reasoning

The Verbal Reasoning section measures your ability to:

  •   analyze and draw conclusions from discourse; reason from incomplete data; identify author's assumptions and/or perspective; understand multiple levels of meaning, such as literal, figurative and author's intent
  • select important points; distinguish major from minor or relevant points; summarize text; understand the structure of a text
  • understand the meanings of words, sentences and entire texts; understand relationships among words and among concepts

The Verbal Reasoning section measures your ability to understand what you read and how you apply your reasoning skills.

Get a quick view of the Verbal Reasoning Question types.

Take a closer look at the Verbal Reasoning section, including sample questions with rationales, tips and more.

 

Quantitative Reasoning

The Quantitative Reasoning section measures your ability to:

  • understand quantitative information
  • interpret and analyze quantitative information
  • solve problems using mathematical models
  • apply basic mathematical skills and elementary mathematical concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and data interpretation
  • includes real-life scenarios

The Quantitative Reasoning section includes an on-screen calculator. If you are taking the paper-delivered test, a calculator will be provided at the test center.

Get a quick view of the Quantitative Reasoning Question types.

Take a closer look at the Quantitative Reasoning section, including sample questions with rationales, tips and more.

 

Analytical Writing

The Analytical Writing section measures your ability to:

  • articulate complex ideas clearly and effectively
  • support ideas with relevant reasons and examples
  • examine claims and accompanying evidence
  • sustain a well-focused, coherent discussion
  • control the elements of standard written English

The Analytical Writing section requires you to provide focused responses based on the tasks presented, so you can accurately demonstrate your skill in directly responding to a task.

Get a quick view of the Analytical Writing Question types.

Take a closer look at the Analytical Writing section, including sample questions with rationales, tips and more.

 

Modified Versions of Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning Questions

The test you take may include questions that are modified versions of published questions or of questions you have already seen on the test. Some modifications are substantial; others are less apparent.

Even if a question appears to be similar to a question you have already seen, it may in fact be different and have a different answer. Pay careful attention to the wording of each question.

What to Bring on Test Day

You need to bring two things to the test center:

 

  1. Your Registration Number:

Your registration number is on your Registration Confirmation. Go to your online profile the day before the test. Any changes made at the test site (like the start time) will be updated for you.

 

To view or print your Registration Confirmation:

 

  • Log in to your GRE iBT Online Profile.
  • Enter your username and password.
  • Once on your Home Page, click View Order(s). From this screen you can print and/or email your Registration Confirmation.

       

      2.  Valid, acceptable identification (ID) document(s):

Test takers are advised to bring at least two forms of acceptable ID each time they report to a test center.

With few exceptions, ID documents must meet all of the following requirements. Each ID document must:

 

  • be an original document; photocopied documents are not acceptable
  • be valid; expired documents (bearing expiration dates that have passed) are not acceptable
  • include the test taker's full name matching exactly the name used to register
  • include a recent photograph that clearly matches the test taker
  • include the test taker's signature

 

For more information, see Identification Requirements.

If you do not bring valid and acceptable identification, or if the name on your ID does not exactly match the name on your registration, you will not be permitted to test and your test fee will not be refunded.

 

  • You may be required to show your ID and/or to sign a test center log at various points throughout the test administration.

  • If the test administrator questions the ID you present, you may be required to provide a supplemental ID. If positive confirmation cannot be made, you may not be permitted to test or your test scores may be held or canceled.

  • Prior admission to a test center based on a given ID document does not guarantee that that document will be considered acceptable. Test centers are not required to hold your seat if you leave the center to obtain acceptable identification.

  • Admission to the test center does not assure that the ID you provided is valid or that your scores will be reported. All reported cases of questionable ID are subject to review and approval by the ETS Office of Testing Integrity either during or after the test administration. ETS reserves the right to hold and/or cancel scores in the event that the ID requirements set forth herein are not met.
  • Your test fee will not be refunded if you are not permitted to test or if your scores are held or canceled because of invalid or unacceptable ID.

 

What to Expect on Test Day Flyer (PDF)

Identification (ID) Requirements

Identification (ID) Requirements

 

When you register for a GRE iBT test, you will be required to provide identification (ID) information. In addition, you must spell your name exactly as it appears on the primary ID document(s) you plan to bring to the test center on test day (other than hyphens, accents or spaces). If the ID document you plan to bring contains a multiple-part first or last name, enter the names in the appropriate first or last name fields when you register so they exactly match the names on your ID.

 

Test takers are responsible for bringing valid and acceptable ID each time they report to a test center. It is your responsibility to ensure that your ID documents are up-to-date and available on the day of the test.

If you do not bring valid and acceptable ID, or if the name on your ID does not exactly match the name on your registration, you will not be permitted to test and your test fee will not be refunded.

 

Acceptable Primary ID Documents

Testing Within Your Country of Citizenship.

 

The following ID documents are acceptable for admission to a test center within your country of citizenship:

 

  • Passport with name, photograph and signature
  • National ID with name, photograph and signature
  • Driver’s license with name, photograph and signature
  • State or Province ID card, including those issued by motor vehicle agencies, with name, photograph and signature
  • Military ID with name, photograph and signature
  • Testing Outside Your Country of Citizenship

 

If you are testing outside your country of citizenship:

  • You must present a valid passport with your name, photograph and signature as your primary ID.

  • Diplomatic and embassy IDs cannot be used as primary identification in place of passports.

  • If your passport is not written in English-language letters, you must also present a supplemental ID that includes your name, a recent, recognizable photograph and is written in English.

 

Unacceptable ID Documents

 

The following documents are not acceptable as primary or supplemental ID under any circumstances:

 

  • Any document that is photocopied or expired
  • Any document that does not exactly match the name you used when you registered
  • International driver's license
  • Draft classification card
  • International student ID
  • Credit/debit card of any kind
  • Notary-prepared letter or document
  • Birth certificate
  • Social security card
  • Employee ID card
  • Any temporary ID card
  • Diplomatic, consulate or embassy ID card

 

Note: If your ID document is not written in English-language letters and the test center supervisor cannot read it, you may not be able to test and your test fee will not be refunded.

Test Scores

Scores

 

GRE® test scores are valid for five years after the testing year in which you tested (July 1–June 30). Currently, scores earned from July 1, 2009, to the present are available.

 

Scores Reported

In late 2014, ETS will make test-taker photos and essay responses on the Analytical Writing section available to designated score recipients as part of an institutional portal that we are launching. Photos and Analytical Writing essay responses of all individuals who report their scores to institutions on or after July 1, 2014, will be included in the portal when it is launched. In the portal, the photo and essay responses from each revised General Test administration you select from your five-year reportable history will be made available as part of your score record to the institutions you designated to receive your scores on or after July 1, 2014.

 

GRE® revised General Test (tests taken on or after August 1, 2011)

Section

Score Scale
Verbal Reasoning
130–170, in 1 point increments
Quantitative Reasoning
130–170, in 1 point increments
Analytical Writing
0–6, in half point increments
If no questions are answered for a specific measure (e.g., Verbal Reasoning), then you will receive a No Score (NS) for that measure.



GRE® General Test (tests taken prior to August 1, 2011)
Section
Score Scale*
Verbal Reasoning
200–800, in 10-point increments
Quantitative Reasoning
200–800, in 10-point increments
Analytical Writing
0–6, in half-point increments

If no questions are answered for a specific measure (e.g., Verbal Reasoning), then you will receive a No Score (NS) for that measure.

*Score reports include Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning scores on the prior 200–800 scales as well as estimated Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning scores on the 130–170 score scales.

See when your scores will be available.

 

ScoreSelect® Option

The ScoreSelect® option lets you decide which test scores to send to the institutions you designate. As part of your four free score reports, you can send scores from your most recent test administration or from all administrations of the General Test taken in the last five years. After test day, you can send scores from your Most RecentAll or Any specific test administration(s) for a fee when ordering Additional Score Reports. Just remember, scores for a test administration must be reported in their entirety.

The ScoreSelect option helps you approach test day with more confidence, knowing you can send the scores you feel show your personal best. It is available for both the GRE revised General Test and GRE® Subject Tests, and can be used by anyone with reportable scores from the last five years. For more information on your score reporting options, see Sending Your Scores.

GRE Scores Explained

Understanding Your Scores

 

Your official GRE® score report contains your:

  • Contact information (name, phone number and email)
  • Date of birth
  • Gender
  • Intended graduate major
  • Test date(s)
  • GRE test score(s) and the associated percentile ranks
  • Authorized score recipients or fellowship sponsors and the scores reported to those institutions
  • Cumulative record of scores reported within the last five years

Official score reports sent to the institutions you designate include your:

  • Contact information (name, address, phone number, email)
  • Intended graduate major
  • GRE test score(s) and the associated percentile ranks

Score reports sent to institutions will not include any information concerning the other score recipients you have chosen. Additionally, institution score reports include only the scores that you selected to send to them using the ScoreSelect® option. There will be no special indication if you have taken additional GRE tests. See a sample institution score report (PDF).

In late 2014, ETS will make test-taker photos and essay responses on the Analytical Writing section of the revised General Test available to designated score recipients as part of an institutional portal that we are launching. Photos and Analytical Writing essay responses of all individuals who report their scores to institutions on or after July 1, 2014, will be included in the portal when it is launched. In the portal, the photo and essay responses from each General Test administration you select from your five-year reportable history will be made available as part of your score record to the institutions you designated to receive your scores on or after July 1, 2014.

 

GRE® revised General Test Interpretative Data
(for tests taken on or after August 1, 2011)

The following resources will help you gain a better understanding of what your scores mean and how we advise institutions to use them.

 

GRE® General Test Interpretative Data
(for tests taken before August 1, 2011)

The following resources will help you gain a better understanding of what your scores mean and how we advise institutions to use them.

Score reports include Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning scores on the prior 200–800 scale, in 10-point increments, as well as estimated Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning scores on the current 130–170 score scale, in one-point increments. See a sample score report(PDF).

  • Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning Concordance Information (PDF) — Contains two concordance tables: one for the Verbal Reasoning measure and one for the Quantitative Reasoning measure. The table for each measure provides scores on the prior 200–800 score scales, the corresponding estimated scores on the current 130–170 score scales and the corresponding percentile ranks.

Score Reporting

GRE scores are part of your reportable history for five years after the testing year in which you tested (July 1 to June 30). Currently, scores earned from July 1, 2009, to the present are available. With the ScoreSelect option, you can decide which scores to send to the institutions you designate. See Sending Your Scores.

Note: Scores from individuals who tested between July 1, 2008 and June 30, 2009, were purged from the GRE database in mid-June 2014. Scores from individuals who tested between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010, will be purged from the GRE database in mid-June 2015.

Percentile Rank

Each GRE test score is reported with a corresponding percentile rank. A percentile rank for a score indicates the percentage of examinees who took that test and received a lower score. Regardless of when the reported scores were earned, the percentile ranks for General Test and Subject Test scores are based on the scores of all examinees who tested within a recent time period.

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions About the GRE® revised General Test

General Information

Which graduate and business school institutions accept GRE® scores?

See the complete list of institutions (PDF) using GRE scores and their official ETS code number.

Which MBA programs accept GRE scores?

Business schools worldwide accept GRE scores for their MBA, specialized master's and other doctoral business programs, including many top-ranked programs. View the most current list of business schools accepting GRE scores for MBA admissions.

What is the price of the test?

See Fees for Tests and Related Services.

How can business schools compare applicants who have submitted GRE scores with applicants who have submitted GMAT® scores?

We have developed the GRE Comparison Tool to allow business schools to place GRE scores in the context of GMAT® scores. Business schools can input GRE Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning scores into the GRE Comparison Tool and the Tool will provide estimated GMAT scores.* An enhanced version of the tool was introduced in July 2013. You can access the GRE Comparison Tool to learn more about it.

*The predicted GMAT scores based on an applicant's GRE scores may not be perfectly equivalent to an applicant’s actual performance on the GMAT exam due to the measurement error inherent in both tests. For this reason, a predicted score range is reported around each predicted GMAT score.

Are there other sources information about the test?

You can sign up for free alerts and reminders about registration, test preparation and more at theTakeTheGRE.com website.

You can visit the official GRE revised General Test page on Facebook®. There you can share advice and cheer on other prospective test takers.

The GRE program participates in student fairs in select locations. These fairs provide an opportunity to talk directly with a representative. Check our schedule for upcoming events.

You can also register for one of our FREE webinars to learn more about the test and test preparation tools and chat with a representative. Available in multiple languages and time zones!

For additional information you can contact GRE test-taker services.

Does ETS offer any services to help match students with graduate and business schools?

Yes. You can add your unique profile to the GRE® Search Service database for free. Graduate and business school recruiters around the world use this database to find prospective students like you. If you match their recruitment profile, you could receive information about their programs, admissions requirements, scholarships and fellowships. It's easy to sign up when you create your My GRE Account. Learn more about GRE Search Service.

What is the ETS® Personal Potential Index?

The ETS® Personal Potential Index (ETS® PPI), gives schools an opportunity to learn more about your strengths in these six areas important for success in graduate study: knowledge and creativity, teamwork, planning and organization, communication skills, resilience, and ethics and integrity.

Evaluators you select provide reliable feedback about you on these six attributes. As a GRE test registrant, you can send up to four FREE reports to the schools of your choice to complement the information provided by GRE scores and transcripts. Learn more about the ETS PPI.

What skills does the test measure?

·  The Verbal Reasoning section measures your ability to analyze and draw conclusions from discourse, understand multiple levels of meaning, select important points and understand the meanings of sentences and entire texts.

· The Quantitative Reasoning section measures your ability to interpret and analyze quantitative information and use mathematical skills such as arithmetic, algebra, geometry, probability and statistics to solve problems.

· The Analytical Writing section measures your ability to sustain a well-focused, coherent discussion, articulate complex ideas clearly and effectively, support your ideas with relevant examples and examine claims and accompanying evidence.

Learn more about what the GRE revised General Test measures.

How does the computer-delivered test work?

The Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections are section-level adaptive, meaning that the first section of the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning measures spans a range of difficulty levels, from easy to difficult. The first section is assembled such that, overall, the first section is of average difficulty. The difficulty level of the second section of each of the measures depends on your performance on the first section. For example, if for the Quantitative Reasoning measure you do very well on the first section, the second section of the Quantitative Reasoning measure will be at a higher level of difficulty. The scoring for the Quantitative Reasoning measure takes into consideration the total number of questions answered correctly across the two sections, as well as the difficulty level of the section (similar process for the Verbal Reasoning measure).

What level of math content is included in the test?

The GRE revised General Test uses the foundations of high school math to test quantitative reasoning. The test material measures your ability to understand basic concepts of arithmetic, algebra, geometry and data analysis; to reason quantitatively; and to solve problems in a quantitative setting.

How does the Analytical Writing section differ from the Writing section of the TOEFL iBT® Test?

The TOEFL iBT Writing Section and GRE Analytical Writing measures are intended to measure different sets of skills. The TOEFL iBT Writing section contains two writing tasks: an independent task asks test takers to support an opinion in writing, and an integrated task that asks test takers to write responses that integrate and organize information from a reading passage and a lecture. These writing tasks are not designed to measure higher levels of critical thinking and analytical writing, but center instead on candidates' composition skills and command of English vocabulary, grammar, spelling, and syntax with some analysis and synthesis of material. Therefore, scores on the two tests are not comparable.

Because the TOEFL® test emphasizes fundamental writing and comprehension skills, the TOEFL score can supplement an Analytical Writing score by helping faculty determine whether a low score on the GRE Analytical Writing measure is due to lack of familiarity with English or lack of ability to produce and analyze logical arguments.

 

Registration

How do I register for the computer-delivered test?

You can register for the computer-delivered test online, by phone, by mail or fax. For more details, see Register for the computer-delivered GRE revised General Test.

How do I register for the paper-delivered test?

Paper-delivered administrations are offered only in areas of the world where computer-delivered testing is not available. You can register for the paper-devlivered GRE revised General Test online or by mail. For more details, see Register for the Paper-delivered GRE revised General Test.

How can I see where and when the test is offered in my region?

View test centers, test dates and seat availability.

What if I need to change the date or location of my test?

If you have registered to take the GRE revised General Test, you must change or cancel your test registration no later than four days before your test date or your test fee will be forfeited. For example, the deadline to cancel a Saturday appointment is Tuesday. For test takers in Mainland China, you must change or cancel your test registration no later than 10 days before your test date. You may change your paper-delivered test registration within the same testing year (July 1–June 30).

If you reschedule your test date, you will be charged a rescheduling fee of US$50. If you cancel your test within the time period indicated above, you will receive a refund equivalent to half of your original test fee. For test takers in Mainland China, follow the instructions on the NEEA website for requesting a partial refund.

If you have registered to take the paper-delivered GRE revised General Test, you may change your test registration within the same testing year (July 1–June 30).

To change the location of your computer-delivered GRE revised General Test from one test center network to another (for example, from a Prometric® test center to a location outside of the Prometric test center network), contact GRE services.

Change or Cancel Your Computer-delivered GRE revised General Test Registration.

Change or Cancel Your Paper-delivered GRE revised General Test Registration.

What if I require testing accommodations?

ETS is committed to serving test takers with disabilities and health-related needs by providing services and reasonable accommodations that are appropriate given the purpose of the test. Testing accommodations are available for test takers who meet ETS requirements. See Accommodations for Test Takers with Disabilities or Health-related Needs.

How often can I retake the test?

You can take the computer-delivered test once every 21 days, up to five times within any continuous rolling 12-month period (365 days). This applies even if you canceled your scores on a test taken previously. You may take the paper-delivered test as often as it is offered.

Test Preparation

How can I prepare for the test?

ETS offers FREE official test prep tools to help you prepare for the GRE revised General Test, including:

· POWERPREP® II, Version 2.2 Software: Preparation for the Computer-delivered GRE revised General Test. This free software includes two full-length practice tests. It provides a simulated, timed test-taking experience and demonstrates the test-taker friendly design features — including moving back and forth and changing answers within a section and the on-screen calculator. POWERPREP II, Version 2.2 is Mac®- and PC-compatible.

· Sample questions from the Verbal ReasoningQuantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing sections.

·  An in-depth look at each test section, plus test-taking strategies and tips.

·  Practice Book for the Paper-based GRE® revised General Test, Second Edition (PDF). This is a simulated test-taking experience of the paper-delivered GRE revised General Test. You'll get the following: one full-length paper-delivered test, test-taking strategies, sample Verbal and Quantitative questions with explanations, sample Analytical Writing topics, scored Analytical Writing responses and reader commentary, and information on how the test is scored.

· Khan Academy® instructional videos that provide additional information about the concepts covered in the Math Review.

 

For even more practice, you can purchase these official test preparation materials from ETS:

· GRE® Success Starter Video Series. Doing your best on the GRE revised General Test is easier with this expert overview to jumpstart your test prep. These short videos give you a solid review of the three test measures, a helpful tour of the test-taker friendly design features, valuable test-taking tips and strategies, and so much more.

·  NEW! Official GRE® Verbal Reasoning Practice Questions, Volume One. Get ready with 150 REAL GRE® Verbal Reasoning questions — direct from the test maker! This guide provides 150 never-before-published verbal reasoning questions with complete explanations and valuable hints and tips. It also includes new practice for the GRE Analytical Writing measure.

· NEW! Official GRE® Quantitative Reasoning Practice Questions, Volume One. Get ready with 150 REAL GRE Quantitative Reasoning questions — direct from the test maker! This guide provides 150 never-before-published quantitative reasoning questions with complete explanations and valuable hints and tips. It also includes a review of the math topics likely to appear on the test.

·The Official Guide to the GRE® revised General Test. From the maker of the GRE revised General Test, the second edition of our official test prep book — which includes a copy of the POWERPREP II, Version 2.2 Software CD-ROM — includes four complete practice tests (two in the book and two on CD), hundreds of authentic test questions, explanations for many answers, test-taking strategies, sample essay responses with reader commentary and more. Available in print or eBook versions. POWERPREP II, Version 2.2 is Mac- and PC-compatible.

· Mobile App! Official GRE® Guide. The Official GRE Guide app is the only GRE app direct from the test maker. Featuring the authentic test questions with answers and explanations plus more from The Official Guide to the GRE revised General Test, Second Edition, this app lets you bring the test experts with you wherever you go!

Download on the App Store

·   ScoreItNow!™ Online Writing Practice. This service lets you sharpen your writing skills as you prepare for the Analytical Writing measure of the GRE revised General Test. Even better, receive an immediate, confidential score to see how well you performed.

Can I use older test preparation materials to prepare for the test?

The GRE revised General Test, introduced in August 2011, features a new test-taker friendly design and new question types, so using test prep for the prior version of the test is not recommended. The good news is FREE official test prep materials are available. SeePrepare for the GRE revised General Test.

What word processing software is used for the Analytical Writing section of the computer-delivered test? What tools does it have?

The GRE Program uses an elementary word processor developed by ETS so that individuals familiar or unfamiliar with specific commercial word processing software do not have an advantage or disadvantage. The ETS software contains the following functions:

·  inserting text

·  deleting text

·  cutting and pasting

·  undoing the previous action

Tools such as spell-checkers and grammar-checkers are not available in the ETS software, in large part to maintain fairness with regard to those examinees who handwrite their essays at paper-delivered administrations. You can practice writing essays using the word processor component of GRE POWERPREP II software.

Test Administration

How is the test administered?

The computer-delivered test is offered year round at Prometric® test centers, and also offered on specific dates at additional testing locations outside of the Prometric test center network.

In areas of the world where the computer-delivered test is not available, a paper-delivered test is administered up to three times per year (October 18, 2014, November 8, 2014 and February 7, 2015). Learn more about the paper-delivered test.

How long is the test?

The total testing time for the computer-delivered test is around three hours and 45 minutes, plus short breaks. Get more details on the timing and tasks for each section.

Learn more about timing and tasks for the paper-delivered test.

Can I use a calculator on the test?

The computer-delivered GRE revised General Test includes an on-screen calculator for use in the Quantitative Reasoning section to reduce the emphasis on computation and to focus more attention on reasoning skills. The calculator has four functions (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) and a square root. For paper-delivered tests, calculators are provided at the test center for use during the test. You may not bring your own calculator.

For the paper-delivered GRE revised General Test, calculators are provided at the test center for use during the test. You may not bring your own calculator.

For multiple answer questions, if I get any of the answers correct, do I receive partial credit?

For the questions with multiple answers, all of the selections made must be correct in order to receive credit for answering the question correctly.

What if I observe irregular behavior at the testing site?

Please contact ETS as soon as possible to report any observed irregular behavior that may lead to an invalid score — for example, someone copying from another test taker, taking a test for someone else, having access to test questions or answers before the test or using notes or unauthorized aids. All information is held in strictest confidence.

Email:

TSReturns@ets.org

Phone:

1-800-353-8570 (United States only)
1-609-406-5430

Fax:

1-609-406-9709

Scoring and Reporting

How are the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections scored?

Computer-delivered Test:

The Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning measures are section-level adaptive. This means the computer selects the second section of a measure based on the performance on the first section. Within each section, all questions contribute equally to the final score. For each of the two measures, a raw score is computed. The raw score is the number of questions answered correctly.

The raw score is converted to a scaled score through a process known as equating. The equating process accounts for minor variations in difficulty among the different test editions as well as differences in difficulty among individuals' tests introduced by the section-level adaptation. Thus a given scaled score of a particular measure reflects the same level of performance regardless of which section was selected and when the test was taken.

Paper-delivered Test:

Scoring of the Verbal and Quantitative sections of the paper-delivered General Test is a two-step process: 

·  First, a raw score is computed. The raw score is the number of questions the test taker answered correctly.  

·  The raw score is then converted to a scaled score through a process known as equating. Equating accounts for differences in difficulty among the different test editions. Thus, a given scaled score for a particular measure reflects the same level of ability regardless of the edition of the test that was taken.

For more information, see How the Test Is Scored.

How is the Analytical Writing section scored?

Computer-delivered Test:

For the computer-delivered test, each essay receives a score from at least one trained reader, using a six-point holistic scale. In holistic scoring, readers are trained to assign scores on the basis of the overall quality of an essay in response to the assigned task. The essay score is then reviewed by e-rater®, a computerized program developed by ETS, which is used to monitor the human reader. If the e-rater evaluation and the human score agree, the human score is used as the final score. If they disagree by a certain amount, a second human score is obtained, and the final score is the average of the two human scores.

The final scores on the two essays are then averaged and rounded to the nearest half-point interval on the 0–6 score scale. A single score is reported for the Analytical Writing measure. The primary emphasis in scoring the Analytical Writing section is on your critical thinking and analytical writing skills rather than on grammar and mechanics.

Paper-delivered Test:

For the paper-delivered test each essay receives a score from two trained readers using a six-point holistic scale. In holistic scoring, readers are trained to assign scores on the basis of the overall quality of an essay in response to the assigned task. If the two scores differ by more than one point on the scale, the discrepancy is adjudicated by a third GRE reader. Otherwise, the two scores on each essay are averaged.

The final scores on the two essays are then averaged and rounded to the nearest half-point interval on the 0–6 score scale. A single score is reported for the Analytical Writing measure. The primary emphasis in scoring the Analytical Writing section is on critical thinking and analytical writing skills rather than on grammar and mechanics.

For more information see How the Test Is Scored.

Will I see my scores at the test center when I take the computer-delivered test?

After completing the computer-delivered GRE revised General Test, you will be given the opportunity to Report or Cancel your scores. If you choose Report Scores, you will see yourunofficial scores for the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning measures at the test center. Because of the Analytical Writing essay scoring process, you will not be able to view your Analytical Writing score at the testing center.

Although you have the option to cancel your scores, consider very carefully before doing so because the score reporting choices available with the ScoreSelect® option allow you to report only the scores you feel reflect your personal best. If you cancel your scores, neither you nor any schools will ever see them and they will not be part of your reportable history. If you select to report your scores, you will view your unofficial scores on the screen and the score will become a part of your reportable history.

Your official scores will be available in your My GRE Account and sent to your score recipients approximately 10–15 days after your test date.

What scores are reported?

Three scores are reported on the GRE revised General Test: 

·  A Verbal Reasoning score is reported on a 130–170 score scale, in 1-point increments.

·  A Quantitative Reasoning score is reported on a 130–170 score scale, in 1-point increments.

·  An Analytical Writing score is reported on a 0–6 score level, in half-point increments.

Learn more about the scores reported.

How do I send my scores to an institution?

Your test fee entitles you to request that scores be sent to as many as four graduate institutions or fellowship sponsors at no additional cost.

·  For the computer-delivered GRE revised General Test, you will be asked to designate your score recipients at the test center or you can choose not to report your scores at that time.

·  For the paper-delivered GRE revised General Test, you will be asked to designate your score recipients during registration or on your admission ticket correction stub.

And with the ScoreSelect option, you can decide which test scores to send to the institutions you designate, so you can send the scores you feel show your personal best. See Sending your Scores.

You can also send score reports to institutions after test day for a fee. See Ordering Additional Score Reports.

When will my official scores be reported after testing?

If you take the computer-delivered GRE revised General Test, your official scores will be available in your My GRE account and sent to the institutions you designated approximately 10–15 days after your test date.

If you take the paper-delivered test, your official scores will be available in your My GRE account and sent to the institutions you designated within six weeks after your test date.

Can I view my scores online?

Yes. Once your official scores are reported, you will receive an email from ETS indicating you can view your scores online free of charge through your My GRE Account. See Getting Your Scores for more information.

How can I get an official Examinee Score Report?

If you wish to have a paper copy of your official Examinee Score Report, you may use the print functionality in your My GRE Account to print a copy of your official score report. For more information, see Getting Your Scores.

If you would like ETS to send you a copy of your official Examinee Score Report, submit anAdditional Score Report Request form (PDF) and US$27 fee to receive a copy. For more information, see Ordering Additional Score Reports.

How will institutions compare scores on the GRE General Test administered prior to August 2011 with scores on the GRE revised General Test?

Since GRE scores are valid for five years, it is likely that schools will receive score reports from applicants who took the current test, the prior test or both. The GRE program provides institutions with concordance information (PDF) to help compare scores from the prior score scales (200–800) to the current score scales (130–170). For individuals who tested prior to August 1, 2011, concordance information is included on score reports (PDF) issued in November 2011 and beyond.

I received an 800 on the Quantitative Reasoning section of the prior GRE General Test, but an 800 only concords to a 166 on the current Quantitative Reasoning score scale. Why is that?

One of the benefits of changing to the current 130–170 score scale was to get better use of the entire score scale range. For example, with the prior 200–800 score scale, test takers who scored 800 on the Quantitative Reasoning measure were bunched at the top of the scale with a percentile rank of 94. With the current 130–170 score scale, high ability candidates will be spread across multiple points at the upper end for more differentiation. So, a 166 on the current score scale represents a percentile rank of 94, but we can now distinguish candidates' performance at score points above a percentile rank of 94.

We are advising institutions that they should use broader criteria when evaluating applicants during this transition period. For applicants who received Quantitative Reasoning scores of 800 on the prior GRE General Test, in particular, we are recommending that institutions use special care in evaluating those applicants because they earned the highest score possible on that measure of the prior test.

Keep in mind that concorded scores are estimates and are not necessarily the scores test takers would receive if they were to take the GRE revised General Test. Any individual who took the prior GRE General Test who wishes to have his or her actual scores reported on the current 130–170 scale may choose to take the GRE revised General Test at any time.

The concordance tables do not include all of the scores on the current 130–170 score scales. Why?

The concordance tables provide information about the scores on the prior 200–800 score scales, the current 130–170 score scales and the corresponding percentile ranks. Only those scores on the current scales that have a corresponding score on the prior scale are included in the tables.

How long are GRE scores valid?

GRE scores are valid for five years after the testing year in which you tested (July 1–June 30). Currently, scores earned from July 1, 2009, to the present are available.

How do I order additional score reports?

There are three easy ways to order ASRs: online, by mail or by fax. See Ordering Additional Score Reports for more information on fees and options.

GRE IBT test dates at GRBS

 

GRE test dates at GRBS for 2018

  
Test Date Day
02 May 2018 Wednesday 
08 May 2018 Tuesday 
16 May 2018 Wednesday  
24 May 2018 Thursday 
30 May 2018 Wednesday   
12 June 2018 Tuesday
20 June 2018 Wednesday
27 July 2018 Friday
10 August 2018 Friday
27 August 2018 Monday
01 September 2018 Saturday
14 September 2018 Friday 
22 September 2018 Saturday 
28 September 2018 Friday  
09 October 2018 Tuesday 
11 October 2018 Thursday 
25 October 2018 Thursday 
29 October 2018 Monday 
05 November 2018 Monday 
12 November 2018 Monday 
20 November 2018 Tuesday  
29 November 2018 Thursday  
02 December 2018 Sunday 
06 December 2018 Thursday 
14 December 2018 Friday  
18 December 2018 Tuesday 
28 December 2018 Friday  

 

Register for a test right now.
 
Test fee is 205$
Late registration closes three days before your test date (not including the test day) and has a late fee of 25$.

Test process

Test process

Knowing what to expect can put you more at ease on test day.

Here is what typically happens:

 

Before the Test

 

  • Plan to arrive at the test center at least 30 minutes before your specified start time. If you come late, you may not be able to take the test.
  • ETS reserves the right to ensure the security of the test content by using electronic detection scanning devices (for example, hand-held metal detectors/wands).
  • Failure to comply will result in dismissal from the test center and your test fee will not be refunded.
  • Your photo will be taken and placed at your assigned seat. It will also appear on your score report.
  • You will be asked to sign a required confidentiality agreement.
  • Identification documents are the only personal items you are allowed to have in the testing room. Cell phones and other electronic devices are not permitted.
  • Your seat will be assigned by the test administrator.
  • No schedule changes can be made at the test center.
  • Testing premises may be videotaped for security reasons.
  • ID verification may also include thumb printing, signature comparison or other forms of electronic ID confirmation.

 

On Test Day

You need to bring two things to the test center:

1.     Your Registration Number:

2.     Valid, acceptable identification (ID) document(s):

 

  • If you do not bring valid and acceptable identification, or if the name on your ID does not exactly match the name on your registration, you will not be permitted to test and your test fee will not be refunded.

  • The test takes about 4 1/2 hours. No one is allowed to continue beyond the time limit.

  • There is a mandatory 10-minute break midway through the test.

  • Watch your pace so you do not go over your time for each section; the computer is the official timekeeper.

  • If you need help for any reason, simply raise your hand.

  • Cell phones and other devices are not permitted during the test or during breaks. (If you have health-related needs requiring you to bring equipment, beverages or snacks into the testing room or to take extra or extended breaks, you need to request accommodations in advance. Procedures for requesting accommodations are described in the Bulletin Supplement for Test Takers with Disabilities or Health-related Needs (PDF).

  • A standard QWERTY English-language keyboard is used for the test. It is a good idea to practice on this type of keyboard prior to the test so that you are familiar with the layout and function keys.

  • Scratch paper is provided and must be returned at the end of the test.

 

After the test

 

  • Your scores will be posted online approximately 10 days after the test date.
  • You can view your scores online by logging in to your TOEFL iBT account and selecting "View Scores" on your home page.
  • Scores are also mailed to you (if you requested a paper copy) and the universities or institutions you selected approximately 13 days after the test date.
  • You can take the test again to improve your scores. There is no limit to the number of times you can take the test, but you cannot take it more than once within a 12-day period. If you already have a test appointment, you cannot register for another test within 12 days of your original appointment.

Online application

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